“You Break It, You Buy It!” Photographer Takes Adobe to Court for “Deleting” Photos Worth $250k

Have you ever accidentally deleted a ton of stuff?

I know I have, and I’m sure many of the readers of this blog have as well.

And, boy, what a time that can be in life.

Image via Negative Space from Pexels.com.

From hating yourself to the whole world, accidentally getting rid of troves of digital data can be a compromising situation for anyone.

One photographer, however, who claims Adobe deleted his files, is taking it to the next level: A full-fledged lawsuit.

Alleging that Adobe deleted $250k worth of files, photographer Dave Cooper claims that an error with Premiere Pro CC 2017 version 11.1.0’s “Clean Cache” feature accidentally deleted non-temporary files.

Adobe, for its part, was aware of this error and issued a fix in May 2017, posting the following message: “The update changes the behavior of the media cache deletion. With 11.1.1, only files that are within the Media Cache folder’s subdirectories will be deleted. Files that sit next to it will no longer be affected. However, we still strongly recommend keeping the Media Cache folder separate from your original media.”

Cooper claims he moved the “Media Cache” folder to another drive but the “Clear Cache” feature still deleted all items beyond 90 days old, including “JPEG files, PSD files, PDF files, and 100,000 individual video clips representing about 500 hours of footage captured between 2010 and 2017 in countries around the world” according to PetaPixel.

Dave Cooper works as a professional commercial photographer and commands high sums for his work. The lawsuit alleges, “Plaintiff captured the Footage using professional-grade video equipment, including Canon C100 and Canon 5D Mark II and Mark III cameras and lenses. Plaintiff estimates that the Footage cost approximately $250,000 to capture and create.”

He apparently tried to work with Adobe to come to a settlement but they were unsuccessful. Now he wants a jury trial and is seeking “compensatory, incidental, or consequential damages” that will be set by a jury.

The post “You Break It, You Buy It!” Photographer Takes Adobe to Court for “Deleting” Photos Worth $250k appeared first on Light Stalking.

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Twiggie & Rose Skincare Branding by Menta

Graphic design, art direction, and packaging design by studio Menta for Twiggie & Rose.

Graphic design studio Menta was commissioned to produce a fitting visual identity for Twiggie & Rose, an organic skincare brand from Los Angeles, California. This facial oil is composed of nutrient-rich and anti-inflammatory oils in order to accelerate cellular turnover and clarify the skin. The oil is delivering intense hydration and defend against free radical harm. Menta’s goal was to produce a sophisticated brand identity including communication materials and packaging. The design masterfully portraits the finesse and care considered in the rich oils. Menta’s creative team has created a bespoke serif typeface with warm feminine highlights, which is both elegant and well readable. The natural packaging provides tactile finishes with subtle touches of rose gold foil.

Below you can find some images of the stationery and packaging range. For more, please visit studio Menta’s website or follow the creative team on Behance, Facebook, and Instagram.

Twiggie & Rose skincare branding by Menta
Twiggie & Rose skincare branding by Menta
Twiggie & Rose skincare branding by Menta
Two-sided business cards.
Twiggie & Rose skincare branding by Menta
Twiggie & Rose skincare branding by Menta
Twiggie & Rose skincare branding by Menta
Twiggie & Rose skincare branding by Menta
Twiggie & Rose skincare branding by Menta
The packaging provides tactile finishes with subtle touches of rose gold foil.

All images © by graphic design studio Menta. We recommend you to have a look at our Graphic Design, Branding, and Packaging Design categories to find more projects produced by countless designers and studios from around the globe.

The post Twiggie & Rose Skincare Branding by Menta appeared first on WE AND THE COLOR.

Opinion: Samsung Wasn’t So Bad of a Camera Company; Folks Just Didn’t Give Them a Chance

Does anyone else remember when Samsung did the „Ditch the DSLR“ event many years ago in an effort to win market share and convert the world over to mirrorless cameras? I do; and at the moment I too probably didn’t give them enough credit. But in retrospect, Samsung was an absolutely brilliant and genius company when it came to cameras and envisioning the future. The problem though is that we as consumers just weren’t ready for it; and we were also just not able to get on board with an electronics company with no real major partners besides Schneider giving us cameras.